On 15th September 1940 (later known as Battle of Britain Day), the Luftwaffe launched its largest and most concentrated attack against London in the hope of drawing the RAF to annihilation.

One German Dornier lagged behind and then started heading straight for Buckingham Palace. Sergeant Pilot Ray Holmes attempted to shoot it down before running out of ammunition. Without hesitation, he knew what he had to do; he had to hit it. At speeds in excess of 400mph, they collided.

nose dive - The day a Hawker Hurricane SAVED Buckingham Palace
The Dornier falling on Victoria Station after being rammed by Sergeant Pilot Ray Holmes

The Dornier crashed to earth, prevented from destroying the Palace. The Hurricane TM-B was also critically damaged and entered a vertical dive. Seeing there was no way to save the aircraft, an injured Holmes ejected to safety while the Hurricane plummeted to the ground, crashing where Buckingham Palace Road meets Pimlico Road and Ebury Bridge. Amazingly, these were the only two aircraft to crash on the City of London throughout the entire war.

The recovery of the remains…

Chris Bennett, a veteran of several aircraft excavations, decided to take on the project of excavating this famous aircraft; which was no easy task considering the Hurricane was buried underneath one of London’s busiest roads. After 13 years of planning and setbacks, he finally got the go-ahead to begin excavation, as well as TV production company Mentorn securing a spot on Channel 5 for a live broadcast!

engine uncovered - The day a Hawker Hurricane SAVED Buckingham Palace
The Merlin engine from the Hurricane was discovered in 2012 under Buckingham Palace Road

The recovered Merlin engine, along with other parts, were exhibited at the ‘Westminster at War’ exhibition in Leicester Square and then at the Imperial War Museum. The aluminium engine casing however, was melted down and cast into sculptures, the first two of which were presented to Ray Holme’s family and Her Majesty the Queen.

Queen with sculpture - The day a Hawker Hurricane SAVED Buckingham Palace
Her Majesty the Queen and His Royal Highness Prince Philip were presented with a sculpture of the Hurricane cast from the aluminium engine casing

The BRAND NEW Hawker Hurricane Provenance Medal

And now, a small number of collectors have the chance to own a BRAND NEW Commemorative featuring an ACTUAL piece of the plane that Ray Holmes was flying on the 15th September 1940 when he saved Buckingham Palace!

Hurricane Medal LIFESTYLE CLOSE UP - The day a Hawker Hurricane SAVED Buckingham Palace
The Hawker Hurricane P2725 TM-B Commemorative

This incredible commemorative features an original piece of Hawker Hurricane, meticulously hand-sculpted into the shape of the iconic plane and precision set into the deluxe SUPERSIZE 70mm Medal.

Even without the genuine piece of Hawker Hurricane, this medal is a work of engineering art in its own right. Combined with the original piece of the Hawker Hurricane, you’d have to look for many years to find something better.

Just 250 lucky collectors have the chance to own this special new commemorative. Last year’s Provenance medal featuring a piece of Spitfire SOLD OUT in a matter of days. Click here to secure your Hurricane Commemorative while you still can!

Hurricane Medal BOX - The day a Hawker Hurricane SAVED Buckingham Palace

In today’s video I unbox a medal that features a genuine piece of Hawker Hurricane!

It’s been meticulously hand-sculpted into the shape of the iconic plane and precision set into a deluxe SUPERSIZE 70mm Medal.

And it’s not just any Hawker Hurricane that’s been used to create this medal… The metal used for the sculpture comes from Hawker Hurricane P2725 TM-B – the plane that famously saved Buckingham Palace during a dogfight on Battle of Britain Day 80 years ago!

Whether you’re a collector, military enthusiast OR both, this is a video that you can’t afford to miss!


If you’re interested

Click here to be one of only 250 collectors to own this Hawker Hurricane Commemorative >>>

Hurricane Medal LIFESTYLE 1 - Unboxing a medal crafted from a Hawker Hurricane!

Tomorrow on 28th October a Victorian £5 Banknote is set to sell at auction catalogued at up to £12,000! Now you might be wondering how an old piece of paper could be worth such an extortionate price. Well, even though it is over 150 years old, the banknote is in pristine condition – almost as if it has come straight from the Victorian Cashier who issued it himself!

The £5 Banknote, dated for the 28th December 1863 is a representation of the height of the industrial period and the advances made in Victorian Britain. In fact the design and printing technology was so advanced that the exact design was used up until 1956! You see, British Banknotes have an incredible history that is often overlooked in the collecting world…

The First UK Banknote

In 1694 King William III was at war with France, and as is often the case with warfare, the financial state of the nation was put under pressure. And so the Bank of England was established. One of its main jobs was to issue banknotes in return for deposits of gold or silver. It’s thought that the first banknote ever issued was one for £1000! But seeing as most people’s wages were less than £20 a year in those days, most people never saw a banknote.

123100023 2927512590682554 5079541005404482714 n - The British banknote set to sell for up to £12,000!

Each banknote was handwritten on bank paper addressed to the payee, and signed by a cashier to authenticate it –sort of like a modern day cheque. This is a tradition that continues today as each banknote is issued with the Chief Cashier’s signature.

“I promise to pay the barer on demand the sum of five pounds”

THSBC008 Warren Fisher 1 004.tiff - The British banknote set to sell for up to £12,000!

Before 1853 banknotes were completely handwritten, but the innovation of the Victorian period meant that templates for banknotes could be printed. Therefore cashiers no longer had to sign each note individually. The words “I promise to pay the bearer on demand the sum of Five pounds” were introduced to link the notes to a physical gold value. In theory, anyone could go to the bank and ask them to give them £5 worth of gold in exchange for a £5 banknote, although the meaning has changed today, the tradition remains on the banknotes.

Emergency Wartime issues

2020 wwi emergency bank note front and back - The British banknote set to sell for up to £12,000!

During the First World War, gold was preserved by the government and gold coins in circulation had to be withdrawn. To replace these coins, the Bank of England needed to make a large supply of £1 and 10/- notes available, but the haste at which these were produced meant that there were huge security problems. The notes were too small for cashiers to handle and they had very few anti-counterfeiting measures, but the notes themselves played a vital role in keeping the economy going.

The Second World War Nazi threat

Capture - The British banknote set to sell for up to £12,000!

During World War Two, the British government found out about a Nazi plot to introduced thousands of fake banknotes to destabilise British currency. However the Bank of England took emergency action and changed the colour of some of the notes for the duration of the war. The Nazi’s could not match the high levels of security features on the British banknotes and their plans failed.

Polymer banknotes

Â10 front - The British banknote set to sell for up to £12,000!

Today historic banknotes are harder and harder to get hold of, especially the ones in good condition, and those that are will often sell for thousands of pounds. Few have seen the earlier banknotes, and a small number of us remember using pre-decimal or war time banknotes in our childhoods. This is largely because the paper design which made them more susceptible to damage, so many have been lost over time. The new polymer banknotes first issued in 2016 marked a monumental change in numismatic history, bringing new technology and innovation to our pockets.


If you’re interested

Today you have the chance to own a limited edition pair of Emergency Wartime Banknote reproductions, each struck from 5g of FINE SILVER.

The Emergency Banknotes each carry a fascinating story, and your Silver versions come complete in a presentation folder telling the full story of how these banknotes helped Britain win the war.

2020 wwi emergency bank note in folder lifestyle - The British banknote set to sell for up to £12,000!

JUST 100 of these special FINE SILVER banknotes pairs are available, so click here to order yours now, before it’s too late >>