The new 2021 Gold Proof Sovereign has been released today, and it’s sure to be the Sovereign release of the decade. But you may only have days to own one. Let me tell you why…

We’re in the golden age of the Proof Sovereign. As you may know, the Proof Sovereign has become the UK’s flagship annual release that’s highly sought-after worldwide.

UK 2021 Gold Sovereign product images table - Why time is ticking for you to secure the NEW 2021 Gold Proof Sovereign…

As you can see, recent UK Gold Proof Sovereigns have an undisputed track record of completely selling out. Many with a matter of weeks.

TWO special features to mark Her Majesty’s incredible reign

In 2021 we will mark the Her Majesty the Queen’s milestone 95th birthday.

To celebrate this, the Proof Sovereign features a special one-year-only unique ‘95’ privy mint mark. Sovereigns featuring privy marks are some of the most collectable Sovereigns around, so demand WILL be high.

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One-year-only privy marks are only applied to coins for the most significant events and anniversaries and this is certainly an important one.

But that’s not all!

Most significantly, for the first time since the Proof Sovereign was first issued as a collector’s piece in 1979, the specification has been altered and just 95 mill marks have been precisely engraved on the edge of the coin. A Sovereign would usually have 108 mills. Each one of the 95 mill marks on this coin represents a year of Her Majesty’s life, and is an exceptional tribute to her incredible life and reign.

These TWO special features mean that this Sovereign will be a collecting priority and is sure to be the most sought-after yet.

The most significant Sovereign of this decade

Queen Elizabeth IIs’ reign is arguably one of the most important and impressive in Britain’s history.

That’s because she is longest reigning head of state the UK, and in fact the world, has ever seen. 81% of the British population have been born following her coronation, so she is the only monarch that the majority of us have ever known.

Not only that, only a mere 0.9% of British people are over the age of 90 – so our Queen is part of a very elite club! This could very well be the most significant Sovereign we see this decade – it’s forever a symbol of the Queen’s longevity.

22 Carat Gold Pedigree

UK 2021 Gold Sovereign product images coin obverse reverse - Why time is ticking for you to secure the NEW 2021 Gold Proof Sovereign…

The 2021 Sovereign is minted from 22 Carat Gold and it is this historical pedigree that makes the coin so admired and sought-after around the world.

It is also one of the finest examples of British craftsmanship. The exceptional ‘proof’ finish is the result of the coin being struck up to 4 times using specially polished dies.

The time and effort required to produce the frosted relief and mirrored background of the coin is why a proof finish is considered the pinnacle of the mint-masters art – and the most sought-after by collectors.

And with an edition limit of JUST 7,995 worldwide – the SAME edition limit as last year’s Sovereign that COMPLETELY SOLD OUT in a matter of weeks – this year’s Proof Sovereign has all the elements to be the most collectable gold coin of the year, if not decade.


If you’re interested…

uk 2021 gold sovereign product images coin in box - Why time is ticking for you to secure the NEW 2021 Gold Proof Sovereign…

You can secure the 2021 Gold Proof Sovereign now, but you’ll have to act quickly. You can secure yours today for a down payment of JUST £62.50 followed by nine further interest-free instalments – the most affordable way to own the new coin.

Click here to secure yours for just £62.50 >>

Tomorrow on 28th October a Victorian £5 Banknote is set to sell at auction catalogued at up to £12,000! Now you might be wondering how an old piece of paper could be worth such an extortionate price. Well, even though it is over 150 years old, the banknote is in pristine condition – almost as if it has come straight from the Victorian Cashier who issued it himself!

The £5 Banknote, dated for the 28th December 1863 is a representation of the height of the industrial period and the advances made in Victorian Britain. In fact the design and printing technology was so advanced that the exact design was used up until 1956! You see, British Banknotes have an incredible history that is often overlooked in the collecting world…

The First UK Banknote

In 1694 King William III was at war with France, and as is often the case with warfare, the financial state of the nation was put under pressure. And so the Bank of England was established. One of its main jobs was to issue banknotes in return for deposits of gold or silver. It’s thought that the first banknote ever issued was one for £1000! But seeing as most people’s wages were less than £20 a year in those days, most people never saw a banknote.

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Each banknote was handwritten on bank paper addressed to the payee, and signed by a cashier to authenticate it –sort of like a modern day cheque. This is a tradition that continues today as each banknote is issued with the Chief Cashier’s signature.

“I promise to pay the barer on demand the sum of five pounds”

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Before 1853 banknotes were completely handwritten, but the innovation of the Victorian period meant that templates for banknotes could be printed. Therefore cashiers no longer had to sign each note individually. The words “I promise to pay the bearer on demand the sum of Five pounds” were introduced to link the notes to a physical gold value. In theory, anyone could go to the bank and ask them to give them £5 worth of gold in exchange for a £5 banknote, although the meaning has changed today, the tradition remains on the banknotes.

Emergency Wartime issues

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During the First World War, gold was preserved by the government and gold coins in circulation had to be withdrawn. To replace these coins, the Bank of England needed to make a large supply of £1 and 10/- notes available, but the haste at which these were produced meant that there were huge security problems. The notes were too small for cashiers to handle and they had very few anti-counterfeiting measures, but the notes themselves played a vital role in keeping the economy going.

The Second World War Nazi threat

Capture - The British banknote set to sell for up to £12,000!

During World War Two, the British government found out about a Nazi plot to introduced thousands of fake banknotes to destabilise British currency. However the Bank of England took emergency action and changed the colour of some of the notes for the duration of the war. The Nazi’s could not match the high levels of security features on the British banknotes and their plans failed.

Polymer banknotes

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Today historic banknotes are harder and harder to get hold of, especially the ones in good condition, and those that are will often sell for thousands of pounds. Few have seen the earlier banknotes, and a small number of us remember using pre-decimal or war time banknotes in our childhoods. This is largely because the paper design which made them more susceptible to damage, so many have been lost over time. The new polymer banknotes first issued in 2016 marked a monumental change in numismatic history, bringing new technology and innovation to our pockets.


If you’re interested

Today you have the chance to own a limited edition pair of Emergency Wartime Banknote reproductions, each struck from 5g of FINE SILVER.

The Emergency Banknotes each carry a fascinating story, and your Silver versions come complete in a presentation folder telling the full story of how these banknotes helped Britain win the war.

2020 wwi emergency bank note in folder lifestyle - The British banknote set to sell for up to £12,000!

JUST 100 of these special FINE SILVER banknotes pairs are available, so click here to order yours now, before it’s too late >>

A symbol of royal power for nearly 1,000 years, the Tower of London remains one of Britain’s most iconic attractions.

But did you know that for over 500 years The Tower of London housed The Royal Mint?

It’s safe to say that during The Royal Mint’s time in The Tower, making coins was hot, noisy and dangerous affair. So much so that tampering with coins was considered treason, and the threat of gruesome punishment alone was enough to deter most, if not all, forgers and thieves.

For me, there’s no coin stories as fascinating as the ones that originate from The Royal Mint’s time a at The Tower. Here’s a selection of my very favourite ones…

Health and Safety was not a concern

In stark comparison to the society we live in today, the health and safety of Mint workers was not a top priority during the Mint’s time in The Tower.

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The Royal Mint was housed in The Tower of London for over 500 years, from 1279 to 1810. Image courtesy of Regency History.

Mechanisation in the 1600’s was welcome relief for Mint workers, as up until this point, all coins were made by hand. As a result, it wasn’t unusual for workers to be injured, and the loss of fingers and eyes was not uncommon.

When it came to striking the coins, split second timing and staying alert could mean the difference between making a coin and losing a finger! That’s because in order to strike a coin, one worker would place a handmade piece of metal between two engraved stamps – called dies – and a second worker would then strike it with a hammer. This procedure would stamp the coin design on to the metal, but if both parties were not on the ball sometimes a finger would be removed in the process.

Even then, it actually wasn’t until screw-operated presses were introduced in the 1700’s that life for Mint workers became relatively safe.

Dirty, deadly money

Working in the Mint was dirty and dangerous work. Huge furnaces were used to melt down precious metal, and the air was full of deadly chemicals and poisonous gases. This made the coin making process a real hazard.

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The Silver Melting House at The Royal Mint. Image courtesy of Old UK Photos.

In the 1560’s a group of unfortunate German workers learned this the hard way. Several of them were suspected to have been poisoned by clouds of noxious gas, and they fell incredibly ill. Seasoned workers at the Mint advised them of the cure – to drink milk from a human skull! Despite the so called ‘cure’, several men died.

The mysterious case of Sleeping Beauty

Several decades prior to this, in the 1540’s, William Foxley was another victim of the Mint’s lax health and safety. Though how exactly, still no one to this day knows for sure! Foxley was a potter at the Mint, and one day he fell asleep over his pots and no one could wake him up.

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Engraving of The Mint Engraving by John Bluck after artwork by Thomas Rowlandson & Auguste Charles Puginm from the publication ‘The Microcosm of London’. Image courtesy of The Tower of London.

It’s unclear what exactly caused Foxley’s coma, and allegedly King Henry VIII himself swung by The Tower to check out the mysterious sleeping beauty. For the majority of the British population, the only way they knew what their monarch looked like was thanks to the obverse of the coin. So Foxley will have been disappointed to have slept through his audience with the King.

This case perplexed physicians for 14 days, after which Foxley woke up and was the picture of perfect health. Remarkably he lived for another 40 years.

Tampering with coins was considered treason

Treason was not taken lightly. In fact any tampering with coins, such as shaving silver from the edge of a coin to steal it, was classed as treason and the severe punishments that awaited thieves and forgers was nearly enough in most instances to put them off.

During medieval times, the sentence for a first-time convicted counterfeiter was to remove their right hand. Any second offences were punishable by castration. It’s unknown exactly what followed this particularly gruesome punishment for a third or even a fourth offence.

But if you think this is severe, in later years and right up until the 1700’s male forgers suffered a traitor’s death – that is to be hung, drawn and quartered. Meanwhile, female forgers were either burned at the stake or transported on one of the infamous convict ships to their designated place of exile.


If you’re interested…

The Royal Mint has just released a BRAND NEW UK £5 coin to celebrate its longstanding and fascinating history with The Tower of London.

UK 2020 The Royal Mint Silver Proof 5 Pound Coin Product Images Coin Obverse Reverse - Tales from The Tower’s maximum security Mint – where making coins was a dangerous business

The coin is available in a range of specifications, including Brilliant Uncirculated and extremely limited edition Silver Proof and Silver Proof Piedfort. Given the historical significance of this commemorative, it is expected to be highly sought-after by serious collectors now and in years to come. That said, we do not expect to be able to offer it for long.

Click here for more information and to view the range >>